Chapter

1896–1898 They Went On…“But Did Not Speak to Each Other”

Michael Ainger

in Gilbert and Sullivan

Published in print November 2002 | ISBN: 9780195147698
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849437 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195147698.003.0031
1896–1898 They Went On…“But Did Not Speak to Each Other”

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Orchestral rehearsals for the Leeds Festival began toward the end of September at St. James's Hall. A young and nervous Edward Elgar traveled to London to rehearse his Caractacus. Years later, in a letter to Herbert Sullivan, he recalled how he had urged Sullivan to rest while he went through Caractacus, but Sullivan had remained and made notes of anything which struck him, in that most charming self-sacrificing way which was always his. It was to be Arthur Sullivan's last Leeds Festival; he knew that the committee would be looking for a new conductor for the next. Sullivan had been made well aware of William Gilbert's feelings after the first night of The Beauty Stone. Having been snubbed by Gilbert on stage at the Savoy, now Sullivan, as well as Gilbert, was hurt. The tragedy of that night was that this was the last occasion when Gilbert and Sullivan were to meet.

Keywords: Leeds Festival; Edward Elgar; Caractacus; Herbert Sullivan; Arthur Sullivan; William Gilbert; Beauty Stone; Savoy

Chapter.  7031 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Popular Music

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