Chapter

Natural Philosophy

Christopher M. Cullen

in Bonaventure

Published in print February 2006 | ISBN: 9780195149258
Published online January 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199785131 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149258.003.0004

Series: Great Medieval Thinkers

 Natural Philosophy

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According to Bonaventure, metaphysics, as a branch of natural philosophy, is concerned with the truth of “things”. But unlike physics, which investigates things insofar as they change, metaphysics goes beyond motion and quantity to investigate things simply insofar as they exist or are “beings”. This investigation involves reducing things back to the most fundamental concept, namely, being. It has three main parts: (1) how things came to be from the First Principle, that is, why there is something rather than nothing; (2) how things reflect ideas or “exemplars” in the divine mind, in other words, how things are what they are and are intelligible; and finally, (3) how things “return” to their source, or, the ultimate meaning of things. These three aspects constitute the three parts of metaphysics: emanation, exemplarism, and consummation.

Keywords: metaphysics; emanation; exemplarism; consummation; God

Chapter.  13784 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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