Chapter

Why We Really May Be Immaterial Souls

Peter Unger

in All the Power in the World

Published in print January 2006 | ISBN: 9780195155617
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199850563 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195155617.003.0007
Why We Really May Be Immaterial Souls

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This chapter presents another new challenge to Scientiphicalism. With this challenge, one will see Scientiphicalism to comport very poorly even with his/her central beliefs as to his/her own apparent conscious experiencing, as well as comporting quite terribly with his/her central beliefs as to his/her own believed choosing. The chapter discusses the problem of the many, the experiential problem of the many, how the singularity of experiencing may favor substantial dualism, questions of spatial boundary, the problem of too many real choosers, wholly immaterial souls versus emergentist physical-and-mental complexes, and the wholly immaterial souls of nonhuman animals.

Keywords: Scientiphicalism; experiential problem; singularity; substantial dualism; spatial boundary; real choosers; immaterial souls; nonhuman animals

Chapter.  49938 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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