Chapter

Soviet Russia, 1917–1991

Nicholas V. Riasanovsky

in Russian Identities

Published in print October 2005 | ISBN: 9780195156508
Published online January 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199868230 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156508.003.0010
Soviet Russia, 1917–1991

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This chapter begins by discussing misconceptions about the Soviet Union that stem from the substitution of a struggle of leaders for power. It explains Marxism and Leninism ideologies. It stresses that personal dictatorship, occasionally modified by a narrow oligarchy of a few, became the standard form. It discusses that the Soviet Union became divided into fifteen union republics and, within them, over a hundred smaller subdivisions, based again on the ethnic principles. It clarifies that during some seventy-five years of Communist rule, the Soviet people, particularly Russian people believed in Marxism and Leninism, to different depths and degrees of comprehension.

Keywords: Marxism; Leninism; Communism; Stalin; October Revolution; nationalism; patriotism; Soviet Union

Chapter.  10466 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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