Chapter

Henry Ainsworth and the Development of Protestant Exegesis in the Early Seventeenth Century

Richard A. Muller

in After Calvin

Published in print March 2003 | ISBN: 9780195157017
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849581 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157017.003.0010

Series: Oxford Studies in Historical Theology

Henry Ainsworth and the Development of Protestant Exegesis in the Early Seventeenth Century

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The study of Henry Ainsworth's work as an exegete underlines the broader currents of thought in which the British theologians of the 17th century were involved. Ainsworth insisted on examining the entire text in order to ascertain the meaning of it as a whole, emphasizing right translation to the point of forcing English syntax into Hebraic patterns in order to represent better the meaning of the original text. He also evidences the broad philological interests characteristic of biblical interpreters in the era of orthodoxy, of what is called the targumic pattern of textual analysis in his case. The identification of Ainsworth as an “independent” churchman, exiled to the Netherlands, also serves to underline this broader context, as does his personal encounter with Judaism, however polemical.

Keywords: Targums; Judaism; Henry Ainsworth; Protestant exegesis; Hebraic patterns

Chapter.  11441 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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