Chapter

A Genetic Analysis of Extremes in Externalizing Behavioral Problems and Negative Family Environments

Kirby Deater-Deckard

in Nature, Nurture, and the Transition to Early Adolescence

Published in print May 2003 | ISBN: 9780195157475
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199848065 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157475.003.0015
A Genetic Analysis of                         Extremes in Externalizing Behavioral Problems and Negative Family                         Environments

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This study explores whether the genetic etiology of individual differences in externalizing problems in an “unselected” sample (that is, variation in the “normal” observed range) is similar to or different from the etiology for children selected as being extreme in aggressive and delinquent behavioral problems during the transition to adolescence. It is possible to analyze separately the individual differences in unselected populations and group differences in selected extreme groups using quantitative genetic analysis, as a means of answering this question. The study also examines selected extreme groups of children based on several dimensions of the family environment. Selecting more extreme groups assesses the extent to which family processes involved in child and adolescent adjustment problems in more negative family environments are due to child genetics and environmental factors as part of gene-environment correlational processes.

Keywords: externalizing problems; etiology; children; behavioral problems; adolescence; individual differences; family; adjustment; environmental factors; genetics

Chapter.  7154 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Developmental Psychology

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