Chapter

Introduction

Burt Korall

in Drumminʼ Men

Published in print December 2002 | ISBN: 9780195157628
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849468 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157628.003.0001
Introduction

Show Summary Details

Preview

A few musicians are special. They bring something fresh, new, and unusual to music. Some of these very gifted people establish immediate contact with both the musically knowledgeable and the less informed. Pioneers like Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington adeptly used the existing structure of the entertainment business to advance the cause of music. Drummers also have made meaningful changes in jazz and heightened its expressiveness. By altering concepts of time and rhythm, drummers enrich the music and make it more meaningful. Each decade, one or two more artists of vision come along and push music into the future. Because swing was exciting and a great money maker, clubs, theaters, ballrooms, and hotels increasingly opened their doors to large and small groups of jazz musicians. Its principal vehicle was the big band. The big band was both social and musical, and it conveyed an almost tangible feeling of excitement.

Keywords: jazz; Dike Ellington; Louis Armstrong; big band; swing

Chapter.  2023 words. 

Subjects: American Music

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.