Chapter

“A WOMAN OF EARNEST CONVICTIONS”: THE LYCEUM

J. Matthew Gallman

in America's Joan of Arc

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780195161458
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199788798 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161458.003.0005
 “A WOMAN OF EARNEST CONVICTIONS”: THE LYCEUM

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When the Civil War came to a close, the nation faced a battery of questions, from the fate of the conquered Southern states to whether the nation grant a political voice to African American men while continuing to exclude women. These issues weighed heavily on Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. As an advocate for both women and African Americans, she would be forced to take a position on one of the crucial political debates of the day: which citizens should be granted suffrage in the postwar world? This chapter focuses on Dickinson's participation in the Lyceum Movement, which originated in New England in the late 1820s and in its original embodiment was distinctly local and pointedly educational. Community groups would arrange a series of lectures, commonly on scientific, historical, or philosophical topics, to be delivered by amateur orators, who were almost exclusively men.

Keywords: Anna Elizabeth Dickinson; Lyceum Movement; United States; politics; public speaking; suffrage; American Civil War

Chapter.  8880 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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