Chapter

FROM THE PLATFORM TO THE STAGE: CLINGING TO FAME

J. Matthew Gallman

in America's Joan of Arc

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780195161458
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199788798 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161458.003.0008
 FROM THE PLATFORM TO THE STAGE: CLINGING TO FAME

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After the Panic of 1873 the lyceum circuit fell into decline. Anna Elizabeth Dickinson still enjoyed tremendous popularity and could fill the occasional hall, but she would need new strategies to capitalize on that fame. Even as she climbed summits in Colorado and basked on beaches in New Jersey, Dickinson was contemplating her options. Since her youth, she had dreamed of going on the stage, but as long as lecturing provided an outlet for her passions it would have been folly to change careers. But even as she kept her distance from the theater, Dickinson grew friendly with several actors and actresses. Dickinson would eventually turn to the stage in 1876, opening herself up to particular national scrutiny in the process.

Keywords: Anna Elizabeth Dickinson; theater; stage plays; actors; actresses

Chapter.  13367 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

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