Chapter

Imaginative Literature and the Politics of Botany

Amy M. King

in Bloom

Published in print October 2003 | ISBN: 9780195161519
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199787838 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161519.003.0003
 Imaginative Literature and the Politics of Botany

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This chapter focuses on the set of meanings about botany and botanical practices that were forming in the 18th century to understand the botanical vernacular in its emergent stages. It argues that the bloom narrative emerged from the Linnaean context and then developed as a literary narrative; bloom does not shift in accordance with the botanical changes of the 1830s and beyond but rather with the literary tides out of which that narrative grew. Maria Edgeworth's Belinda, and the poems of Charlotte Smith and Erasmus Darwin are analyzed.

Keywords: botany; Rosseau; girls; female sexuality; botanical vernacular; Linnaeus; Maria Edgeworth; Charlotte Smith; Erasmus Darwin

Chapter.  12148 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century)

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