Chapter

Eschatological Imagination and the Program of Roman Imperial and Ecclesiastical Renewal at the End of the Tenth Century

Benjamin Arnold

in The Apocalyptic Year 1000

Published in print June 2003 | ISBN: 9780195161625
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849666 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161625.003.0014
Eschatological Imagination and the Program of Roman Imperial and Ecclesiastical Renewal at the End of the Tenth Century

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As a system of belief, medieval Christianity was assertively soteriological and eschatological in its teaching. The Catholic Church was much concerned with the science of personal and collective salvation and soteriology. Less coherent were its teachings about eschatology, the collapse of human history and of the Church Militant at the end of time, to be consummated in the Last Judgment. In the Middle Ages, this surrealistic work was usually ascribed to the pen of St. John the Apostle in his old age. The books of the Bible running from the Hebrew prophets in the Old Testament to the Gospels and Epistles in the New, to say nothing of the Book of Revelation as such, are well stocked with speculative eschatological passages. They have provoked an enormous literature from the time of the church fathers onward, some of it determined to establish the exact nature and, even worse, the exact date of the end of human history.

Keywords: Christianity; Catholic Church; salvation; soteriology; eschatology; Last Judgment; St. John the Apostle; Bible

Chapter.  8769 words. 

Subjects: East Asian Religions

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