Chapter

CHANGING OLD FORESTS AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA

Daniel B. Botkin

in Beyond the Stony Mountains

Published in print November 2004 | ISBN: 9780195162431
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199790043 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195162431.003.0013
 CHANGING OLD FORESTS AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA

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This chapter has Lewis and Clark arrive at the mouth of the Columbia River in early December 1805. Lewis and Clark organized the men and built a wooden fort here at a site that was south of the Columbia along the wide mouth of an estuary, away from the strong winds that poured down the Columbia from the interior mountains, and protected by coastal hills and forests from direct exposure to the storms coming from the Pacific. They named the site “Fort Clatsop” after the local Indians. The identification of new species, the California condor, conifer rain forests of the Pacific Northwest, and role of Indians in forest conditions are described.

Keywords: Lewis; Clark; expedition; Columbia River; Fort Clatsop; California condor; conifer rain forests; old-growth forests; Indians

Chapter.  6200 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

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