Chapter

IN THE WAKE OF LEWIS AND CLARK

Daniel B. Botkin

in Beyond the Stony Mountains

Published in print November 2004 | ISBN: 9780195162431
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199790043 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195162431.003.0014
 IN THE WAKE OF LEWIS AND CLARK

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This chapter discusses the significance of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Their journals help us understand what has happened to nature in the American West since European settlement. Perhaps most startling is that the least-celebrated ecological regions — the tall- and shortgrass prairies — are the most changed, difficult to find now even as small remnants. Lewis and Clark's journey also provides insight about the idea of nature. They found a nature much different from that of European expectations: they found a nature of constant change, in which what would happen could at best be estimated as probabilities.

Keywords: Lewis; Clark; expedition; St. Louis; Missouri; Kansas City; Kansas; Fort Benton; Portland; Oregon

Chapter.  4745 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

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