Chapter

Conclusion

Leslie Berlin

in The Man behind the Microchip

Published in print September 2005 | ISBN: 9780195163438
Published online September 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780199788569 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195163438.003.0014
 Conclusion

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This chapter focuses on Robert Noyce's legacy. Many of the companies, organizations, and causes with which Noyce involved himself flourish today. In 2004, roughly $30 billion worth of microprocessors — the little chips Noyce once promoted with missionary zeal before incredulous audiences — were sold around the world. The largest company in this market is Intel, whose microprocessors drive more than 80% of the personal computers on the market today. But Noyce's most enduring legacy is to present a set of ideals that have become an indelible part of American high-tech culture: knowledge trumps hierarchy, every idea can be taken farther, new and interesting is better than established and safe, go for broke or don't go at all.

Keywords: Robert Noyce; Intel; microprocessors; legacy

Chapter.  1252 words. 

Subjects: History of Science and Technology

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