Chapter

Stimulus Novelty Effects on Recognition Memory: Behavioral Properties and Neuroanantomical Substrates

Mark M. Kishiyama and Andrew P. Yonelinas

in Distinctiveness and Memory

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780195169669
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199847563 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195169669.003.0017
Stimulus Novelty Effects on Recognition Memory: Behavioral Properties and Neuroanantomical Substrates

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Why are some events remembered while others are doomed to be forgotten? The answer to this question has to do, in part, with the relative novelty of different events — those that are unusual or distinctive are remembered better than those that are less distinct. Although the beneficial effects of novelty on memory are now well established, significant challenges remain in determining precisely how novelty influences memory and in delineating the brain regions involved in producing novelty effects. This chapter investigates the effects of stimulus novelty, or distinctiveness, on two different processes known to support recognition memory (recollection and familiarity), and examines how the temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex contribute to novelty effects seen in recognition memory by assessing memory in patients with damage to these regions. In studying the effects of novelty on memory, the chapter focuses on primary distinctiveness, using the von Restorff paradigm.

Keywords: novelty effects; primary distinctiveness; von Restorff; stimulus novelty; recognition memory; recollection; familiarity; temporal lobe; prefrontal cortex

Chapter.  9363 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Cognitive Psychology

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