Chapter

The Implications of Family Poverty for a Pattern of Persistent Offending

Carter Hay and Walter Forrest

in The Development of Persistent Criminality

Published in print January 2009 | ISBN: 9780195310313
Published online May 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780199871384 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195310313.003.0003
 							The Implications of Family Poverty for a Pattern of Persistent Offending

Show Summary Details

Preview

The effect of family poverty on individual involvement in crime has long been an important issue in criminological research. A limitation in much of this research involves the tendency of examining the poverty-crime relationship in a static, cross-sectional way. This chapter addresses this limitation by considering how poverty early in life affects the likelihood that a child will fit a life-course-persistent pattern of criminality in which levels of antisocial or criminal behavior emerge early in childhood and continue beyond adolescence. This issue is considered with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a three-wave panel study of U.S. adolescents and their families.

Keywords: poverty; chronic offending; strain theory; life-course criminology; crime

Chapter.  6941 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Social Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.