Chapter

The Social Implications of Separating the Concepts of Intelligence and Rationality

Keith E. Stanovich

in Rationality and the Reflective Mind

Published in print December 2010 | ISBN: 9780195341140
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199894307 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195341140.003.0009
The Social Implications of Separating the Concepts of Intelligence and Rationality

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This chapter explores the social consequences of the modest association between rational thinking and intelligence. It argues that an understanding of the implications of the modest association helps to check the imperialism of the intelligence concept in folk psychology. Extant IQ tests do not measure rational thought, but instead are good indicators of algorithmic-level decoupling ability. Thus, we should not fold rationality into the concept of intelligence, because the most notable operational indicators of the latter do not begin to index the former. Knowledge of a person's intelligence does very little to predict how they will do on measures of rational thinking.

Keywords: rational thinking; intelligence; decoupling; association; ability

Chapter.  6065 words. 

Subjects: Cognitive Psychology

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