Chapter

Wasteful Design: Repetitive DNA Elements

John C. Avise

in Inside the Human Genome

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780195393439
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199775415 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393439.003.0004
Wasteful Design: Repetitive DNA Elements

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This chapter treats repetitive DNA elements in the human genome, ranging from duplicons and pseudogenes (dead genes) to microsatellites to several classes of ubiquitous mobile elements that look and act like intracellular viruses. Incredibly, active or deceased copies of these latter elements make up at least 45% and perhaps 75% or more of the human genome. All of these categories of repetitive elements are known to be associated with legions of genetic disabilities, again prompting a consideration of how various theological excuses for molecular flaws contrast with rationales that emerge from the evolutionary sciences.

Keywords: repetitive DNA; duplicons; pseudogenes; microsatellites; mobile elements; viruses

Chapter.  7574 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Evolutionary Biology

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