Chapter

The How, When, and Why of Configural Processing in the Perception of Human Movement

James C. Thompson

in People Watching

Published in print December 2012 | ISBN: 9780195393705
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780199979271 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393705.003.0018

Series: Oxford Series in Visual Cognition

The How, When, and Why of Configural Processing in the Perception of Human Movement

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While several different neural processes contribute to the perception of biological motion, the responsiveness of a key area, the human superior temporal sulcus (STS), to biological motion appears to be driven largely by the need to integrate motion information with configural body form information. This need reflects the fact that the human body produces complex patterns of articulated motions at multiple spatial locations that are linked by the underlying human form. Such a global integration of motion and form information would provide several advantages to observers of human movement across a variety of otherwise challenging conditions including brief durations, occlusion, and observer movement.

Keywords: superior temporal sulcus (sts); functional magnetic resonance imaging (fmri); biological motion; form processing; body shape; configural processing; articulated motion; occlusion; adaptation; event-related potentials (erps)

Chapter.  10512 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Cognitive Psychology

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