Chapter

The Camouflaged Sacred in Mircea Eliade’s Self-Perception, Literature, and Scholarship

Moshe Idel

in Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780195394337
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199777358 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195394337.003.0008
The Camouflaged Sacred in Mircea Eliade’s Self-Perception, Literature, and Scholarship

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This chapter argues that Eliade’s diverse types of writings––religious, political, historical, literary, or personal––reveal the same underlying assumption: that the sacred camouflages itself within the profane and is therefore largely unrecognizable, and that, in order to reach a higher form of existence, one must be able to recognize its revelations, which are sometimes expressed by signs. The Romanian and Hindu experiences and the Florentine Renaissance were the determinant factors in his thought and literature, far more than his more formal adherence to the Iron Guard in 1937 and his prolonged participation in the Eranos encounters at Ascona from 1950.

Keywords: Eranos; Ascona; René Guenon; Julius Evola; Iron Guard

Chapter.  18275 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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