Chapter

Whose Strategy, Whose Peace? The Role of International Institutions in Strategic Peacebuilding

John Paul Lederach and R. Scott Appleby

in Strategies of Peace

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780195395914
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199776801 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195395914.003.0005

Series: Studies in Strategic Peacebuilding

Whose Strategy, Whose Peace? The Role of International Institutions in Strategic Peacebuilding

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In this chapter, Chesterman grapples with the complex challenges facing the United Nations in post-conflict reconstruction and peacebuilding efforts. He first examines the dilemmas inherent in outside interventions for peacebuilding, particularly those with expanded UN mandates and/or transitional administrations. He argues that workable strategies must increase clarity with regard to the following: the political and strategic objectives of the intervention, the dynamic relationship between international and local actors, and the political and resource commitments required of international actors. In examining prospects for improvement, Chesterman evaluates both the challenges and potential of the Peacebuilding Commission to promote coordination and increase funding for more strategic peacebuilding.

Keywords: United Nations; peacebuilding; post-conflict reconstruction; transitional administration; UN Peacebuilding Commission; intervention

Chapter.  10858 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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