Chapter

Drugs Don't Talk: Do Medication and Biological Psychiatry Contribute to Silencing the Self?

Richard A. Gordon

in Silencing the Self Across Cultures

Published in print March 2010 | ISBN: 9780195398090
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199776900 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.003.0003
Drugs Don't Talk: Do Medication and Biological Psychiatry Contribute to Silencing the Self?

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This chapter examines the recent rise in the use of antidepressant medications as well as the growing emphasis on biomedical explanations for depression. The chapter presents the history of antidepressant medications and changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual as well as an analysis of the shift in the treatment of depression from psychotherapy to drugs. The author provides an overview of evidence for social factors in the origin of depression and argues that social models of depression have been marginalized by the dominance of biomedical discourse and practices. The chapter looks at the gaps in current scientific understanding of what constitutes effective treatment for depression. The chapter also discusses implications for depression treatment that considers the broader social environment and that acknowledges the effects of life stress and trauma.

Keywords: depression; antidepressant medication; social factors; psychotherapy; biomedical model; diagnostic and Statistical Manual; self-silencing

Chapter.  12259 words. 

Subjects: Social Psychology

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