Chapter

STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA)—an extension of the STROBE statement

Julian Little, Julian P. T. Higgins, John P. A. Ioannidis, David Moher, France Gagnon, Erik von Elm, Muin J. Khoury, Barbara Cohen, George Davey Smith, Jeremy Grimshaw, Paul Scheet, Marta Gwinn, Robin E. Williamson, Guang Yong Zou, Kimberley Hutchings, Candice Y. Johnson, Valerie Tait, Miriam Wiens, Jean Golding, Cornelia M. van Duijn, John McLaughlin, Andrew Paterson, George Wells, Isabel Fortier, Matthew Freedman, Maja Zecevic, Richard A. King, Claire Infante-Rivard, Alexandre Stewart and Nick Birkett

in Human Genome Epidemiology, 2nd Edition

Published in print December 2009 | ISBN: 9780195398441
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780199776023 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398441.003.0010
 							STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA)—an extension of the STROBE statement

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This chapter proposes and justifies a set of guiding principles for reporting results of genetic association studies. The epidemiology community has recently developed the STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement for cross-sectional, case-control, and cohort studies. Given the relevance of general epidemiologic principles for genetic association studies, recommendations are proposed in an extension of the STROBE Statement called the STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA) Statement. The recommendations of the STROBE Statement have a strong foundation because they are based on empirical evidence on the reporting of observational studies, and because they involved extensive consultations in the epidemiologic research community.

Keywords: gene associations; STREGA; case-control studies; cross-sectional studies

Chapter.  11120 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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