Chapter

Civil Disobedience

B. R. Nanda

in In Gandhi’s Footsteps

Published in print November 2002 | ISBN: 9780195663433
Published online October 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199081424 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195663433.003.0015
Civil Disobedience

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This chapter discusses Gandhi’s satyagraha struggle in the form of a civil disobedience campaign and non-payment of taxes. It relates that the British authorities initially underestimated the effects of the campaign. By early April, however, the Indian government started to perceive the dangers of Gandhi’s march. This event is a good example of how Gandhi was able to inspire a large group of Indians into action. By early April, however, the Indian government started to perceive the dangers of Gandhi’s march. The discussion then focuses on the commitment of Jamnalal and his family to civil disobedience, which started even before it was initiated. This is seen in Jankidevi’s suggestion that Kamalnayan should be part of the first band of Satyagrahis in the march to Dandi, and her organization of civil disobedience in Bombay while Jamnalal was in Nasik jail.

Keywords: satyagraha campaign; Satyagrahis; civil disobedience; effects of the campaign; Jankidevi; Kamalnayan; Dandi March

Chapter.  7332 words. 

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