Chapter

Right to Family Environment: Adoption and Other Non-Institutional Services

Asha Bajpai

in Child Rights in India

Second edition

Published in print September 2006 | ISBN: 9780195670820
Published online October 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199082117 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195670820.003.0002
Right to Family Environment: Adoption and Other Non-Institutional Services

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This chapter describes child rights vis-à-vis family environment, focusing on adoption. There is no legislation for the adoption of children by Parsis in India. Today, some Muslims do adopt children in India but since there is no law to make their adoption legal, such adoptions remain informal. The canon law does not bar or prohibit Christians from adopting a child. The issue of ‘gender injustice’ is evident in the practice of adoption. A number of documents are needed to adopt a child. This chapter also discusses different interventions and initiatives by non-governmental organizations and the government. It is noted that the Hague Convention is important to India. The proposed common secular law on adoption would possibly be acceptable to all communities if its main focus is on the welfare of the destitute and orphan child and it does not intervene with the inheritance laws.

Keywords: adoption; child rights; Parsis; Muslims; Christians; gender injustice; Hague Convention; India; secular law

Chapter.  24886 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

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