Chapter

Inquiries by Parliamentary Committees<sup>1</sup>

A.G. Noorani

in CONSTITUTIONAL QUESTIONS AND CITIZENS' RIGHTS

Published in print January 2006 | ISBN: 9780195678291
Published online October 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199080588 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195678291.003.0033
Inquiries by Parliamentary Committees1

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This chapter criticises the Opposition's demand for a joint parliamentary committee (JPC) to investigate the involvement of Union Communications Minister Sukh Ram in the Telecom scandal. It contends that only an uneducated Opposition would demand a JPC on the Telecom scandal or any other scandal, and explains that the JPC was most unlikely to complete its job before the general elections. It argues that it is preposterous to suggest that the proposal for an agency outside parliament was an insult to parliament given that the Act of 1952 itself empowers the Lok Sabha to set up a commission of inquiry. This chapter also discusses the ruling on the precedent of the British Marconi Company in 1912.

Keywords: joint parliamentary committee; Opposition; Sukh Ram; Telecom scandal; Act of 1952; Lok Sabha; British Marconi Company

Chapter.  1188 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

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