Chapter

The Inheritance, Christian and Roman

Christopher N. L. Brooke

in The Medieval Idea of Marriage

Published in print June 1994 | ISBN: 9780198205043
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191676468 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205043.003.0002

Series: Clarendon Paperbacks

The Inheritance, Christian and Roman

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The medieval notion of marriage contains an interesting mixture of notions and customs derived from the ancient world, from Judaism and the early Church, and from Rome and the barbarians. From the fundamental rules and customs of marriage, it is quite discernable that matrimony was derived from the Roman law, a secular and part of the world custom inherited by the Christian Church. This chapter discusses the process by which marriage entered the liturgies and the sacraments of the Church during the 11th and the 12th century. It also looks on the process by which matrimony fell into the jurisdiction of the courts of the Church. Included in this chapter are interpretations of the Bible's stand on marriage and St. Augustine's doctrine on matrimony, procreation and consummation.

Keywords: medieval marriage; marriage; 11th century; 12th century; consummation; sacraments; liturgies; Church

Chapter.  7438 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)

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