Chapter

The Failure of the 1150 Crusade and the Development of Ties with Byzantium, 1150–63

Jonathan Phillips

in Defenders of the Holy Land

Published in print March 1996 | ISBN: 9780198205401
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191676611 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205401.003.0005
The Failure of the 1150 Crusade and the Development of Ties with Byzantium, 1150–63

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After the collapse of the siege of Damascus, the Christian armies retreated to the kingdom of Jerusalem and soon the majority of the crusaders returned home. The notable exception to this was King Louis. He remained in the Latin East for almost a year after the end of the Damascus campaign and departed for France after he had celebrated Easter in Jerusalem. Louis's actions may have been restricted by a lack of troops. Faced with a dearth of manpower, an alternative course of action might have been to build new castles and to strengthen the defences of the kingdom. The need for more money was a prominent theme in the letters that Louis sent from Jerusalem to Abbot Suger of St Denis. Shortly after Louis sailed for Europe the Muslims achieved a crucial success.

Keywords: siege; Christians; kings; rulers; troops; Jerusalem

Chapter.  17288 words. 

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)

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