Chapter

The Kirk, the French Revolution, and the Burden of Scottish Whiggery

Colin Kidd

in Religious Change in Europe 1650–1914

Published in print February 1997 | ISBN: 9780198205968
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191676871 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205968.003.0011
The Kirk, the French Revolution, and the Burden of Scottish Whiggery

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The effects of the French Revolutionary threat on Britain's two national religious establishments, the Church of England and the Church, or Kirk, of Scotland, differed substantially. The Church of England had at its disposal a powerful conservative political theology which, even though the diverse ranks of the clergy were by no means tied to a rigid ideology, could nevertheless be deployed unreservedly against the Jacobin menace. In Scotland, attitudes to the crisis were complicated by the embarrassment attaching to the presbyterian Kirk's radical pedigree.

Keywords: Church of England; French Revolution; Kirk; political theology; clergy; Presbyterian; Union of 1707

Chapter.  10731 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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