Chapter

The Britons and the Irish, 350–800

T. M. Charles-Edwards

in Wales and the Britons, 350-1064

Published in print November 2012 | ISBN: 9780198217312
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191744778 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217312.003.0005

Series: History of Wales

The Britons and the Irish, 350–800

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Late‐Roman Britain was subject to attack across the the Irish Sea as well as the North Sea. Many of these attacks were intended to take captives, who were then carried off into slavery in Ireland. One of them was St Patrick, who escaped but returned as a Christian missionary. He and other British missionaries in Ireland created the conditions in which the cultures of Celtic Britain and Ireland were closely linked. Other Irish settled in Britain and became much more receptive to Roman culture than were the Anglo‐Saxon settlers in the east of Britain. The political shape of what became Wales may have been changed by a political transformation in Ireland c. 500.

Keywords: Irish slave‐raids; British slaves in Ireland; Irish settlement in post‐Roman britain; the first Irish Christians; the origins of Gwynedd

Chapter.  9517 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)

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