Chapter

What is the Difference?

L. JONATHAN COHEN

in An Essay on Belief and Acceptance

Published in print September 1995 | ISBN: 9780198236047
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191679179 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198236047.003.0001
What is the Difference?

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In order to answer whether cognition should be perceived as a passive process or an active process, it is first important to establish the difference between the concept of belief and the concept of acceptance, emphasizing on the notion that a belief is not an occurrent feeling but rather a disposition. In this chase, acceptance is not a speech-act and should not be perceived to be the same as assumption, hypothesizing, presumption, or supposition because it is instead a mental policy or act that entails how a person can simultaneously rest on two beliefs but cannot accept them simultaneously. Both acceptance and belief may be practiced in terms of facts and normative issues. This chapter attempts to discuss the conceptual nature of the said distinction.

Keywords: acceptance; belief; occurrent feeling; normative issues; facts; distinction; mental policy

Chapter.  16649 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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