Chapter

Stipulation

Jonardon Ganeri

in Semantic Powers

Published in print March 1999 | ISBN: 9780198237884
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191679544 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198237884.003.0006

Series: Oxford Philosophical Monographs

Stipulation

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New terms can always be introduced into an established, given language. One way to introduce a new term is by explicit stipulation. Another way is by ostension, pointing to a perceptible object. In both cases, the problem for the philosopher of language is one of accounting for the relationship between the meaning of the term and the method by which it was introduced. It is unlikely that there will be any univocal solution; different sorts of term will have different sorts of meaning. Another more general problem then is to find principled ways of dividing terms into semantic groups. This chapter investigates these problems and their solution within the theory of meaning being developed.

Keywords: theory of meaning; explicit stipulation; ostension; proper names; theoretical names

Chapter.  11243 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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