Chapter

Divine Commands and Deontic Logics

Philip L. Quinn

in Divine Commands and Moral Requirements

Published in print October 1978 | ISBN: 9780198244134
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191680755 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198244134.003.0005

Series: Clarendon Library of Logic and Philosophy

Divine Commands and Deontic Logics

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Deontic logics are formal systems that capture the logical principles which govern reasoning involving what ought to be. Sometimes, what ought to be is thought of, narrowly, as encompassing no more than the obligatory; other deontic logicians take what ought to be as covering whatever is ideal, good, or valuable. This chapter attempts to discover whether the fundamental conceptions of some of the more intriguing systems of deontic logic are compatible with a divine command conception of what ought to be. It argues that several of these systems of deontic logic can be provided with foundations in a divine conception of what ought to be.

Keywords: deontic logics; logical principles; reasoning; divine command

Chapter.  6915 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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