Chapter

Sigwart's Theory of the Assertion Contained in an Imperative

Hans Kelsen

in General Theory of Norms

Published in print March 1991 | ISBN: 9780198252177
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681363 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198252177.003.0053
Sigwart's Theory of the Assertion Contained in an Imperative

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No fact can ever contain an assertion, and so neither does the fact of speaking or uttering an imperative. An assertion — i.e. a statement — is the meaning of an act of thought, and to speak or utter an imperative is to give immediate expression to an act of will whose meaning is the imperative (or norm). The assertion Sigwart claims is contained in the imperative is the assertion of the existence of an act of will whose meaning is the imperative (or norm).

Keywords: theory of assertion; imperative; act of thought; act of will; linguistic expression; norms

Chapter.  516 words. 

Subjects: Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law

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