Chapter

The Reporting of Judicial Proceedings

Joseph Jaconelli

in Open Justice: A Critique of the Public Trial

Published in print July 2002 | ISBN: 9780198252580
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681387 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198252580.003.0008
The Reporting of Judicial Proceedings

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This chapter examines various matters regarding the reporting of trials, in particular the privileges against liability under the civil and the criminal law that are conceded in order to facilitate such reporting. The term ‘reporting’ can be used in various senses in order to describe markedly different activities. The first — the sense in which it is used throughout the greater part of this chapter — refers to the process of disseminating as many particulars of the trial as might be of possible interest to those who were not present in the courtroom. The second sense is concerned with the recording of the trial for the official purpose of establishing an authoritative account of the proceedings. Thirdly, there is an intermediate sense in which the term is used: that of law reporting, by which cases of possible value as precedents are drawn together in various series of law reports.

Keywords: trials; criminal law; law reporting; courtroom; proceedings

Chapter.  21991 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law

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