Chapter

Pluralist Democracy, Groups, and Process: USA (I)

P. P. CRAIG

in Public Law and Democracy in the United Kingdom and the United States of America

Published in print January 1991 | ISBN: 9780198256373
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681646 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198256373.003.0003

Series: Clarendon Law Series

Pluralist Democracy, Groups, and Process: USA (I)

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This chapter examines the pluralist democracy, groups, and process in the United States. Many challenge the depiction of the US Constitution as a pluralist document. They argue that it embodies a more republican sentiment, and that the jurisprudence of the courts is consonant with this theme. The meaning and nature of pluralist democracy is first examined. This is considered a complex enquiry, since diverse strands of thought have been placed under the label ‘pluralism’. Second, it argues that three distinctive models of pluralism can be identified: elitism, behaviouralism, and elite pluralism. Third, it focuses its attention upon administrative law, suggesting that the central themes should be delegation of power, and interest representation within the administrative decision-making.

Keywords: pluralist thought; modern pluralism; elitism; behaviouralism; elite pluralism; Madison

Chapter.  9483 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

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