Chapter

Attempt: Contracting Consequentialism—Expanding the Notion of Criminal Harm?

K. J. M. Smith

in Lawyers, Legislators and Theorists

Published in print October 1998 | ISBN: 9780198257233
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681738 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198257233.003.0011

Series: Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice

Attempt: Contracting Consequentialism—Expanding the Notion of Criminal Harm?

Show Summary Details

Preview

Criminal attempt's relative conceptual stasis existing at the end of the nineteenth century is well illustrated by the complete absence from Archbold of any sort of general exposition of attempt principles until 1900. Here particular decisions had previously achieved no more than brief references within the relevant substantive contexts. On the pivotal issue of proximity, courts were fairly evenly divided between favouring Eagleton's requirement of a ‘last act’ or one ‘immediately connected’ with the criminal objective, and Stephen's interruption test.

Keywords: criminal law; criminal harm; criminal attempt

Chapter.  4833 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.