Chapter

The Metropolis

Sir John Baker

in The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Published in print September 2003 | ISBN: 9780198258179
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681806 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198258179.003.0015

Series: The Oxford History of the Laws of England Series isbn 0-19-961352-4

The Metropolis

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This chapter examines the role of the courts of the city of London in the judicial system in England during the Tudor period. The courts were governed by immemorial customs which were not subject to outside review and in the event of a dispute, a custom was tried by the mayor and aldermen and certified orally in the royal courts by the recorder. Despite limited available records, indirect evidence points to a city jurisdiction of major importance, in terms of the number of suits, and of the sums of money involved, and of its possible influence on lawyers who practised in Westminster Hall.

Keywords: city courts; London; English courts; mayor; alderman; immemorial customs; Westminster Hall

Chapter.  7648 words. 

Subjects: History of Law

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