Chapter

The Judiciary

Sir John Baker

in The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Published in print September 2003 | ISBN: 9780198258179
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191681806 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198258179.003.0022

Series: The Oxford History of the Laws of England Series isbn 0-19-961352-4

The Judiciary

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This chapter examines educational and learning opportunities for the members of the judiciary in England during the Tudor period. Judges and chief justices attended readings in their former societies during learning vacations and they enjoyed a collegiality of their own, centred for formal purposes on Westminster Hall and the Exchequer Chamber. In addition to collegial learning, judges also had the benefit of an interchange of opinion on four levels. These include occasional exchange of opinion in assemblies of all the judges in the Exchequer Chamber, in their courts in banc, at readings in the Inns of Court, and at table in the serjeants' inns.

Keywords: judges; chief justices; judiciary; exchange of opinion; collegial learning; education

Chapter.  5472 words. 

Subjects: History of Law

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