Chapter

Forest Laws from Anglo-Saxon England to the Early Thirteenth Century

John Hudson

in The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780198260301
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191740640 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260301.003.0019

Series: The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Forest Laws from Anglo-Saxon England to the Early Thirteenth Century

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By the second half of the twelfth century, perhaps almost one-third of the realm was considered part of the king's Forest. Forest extended beyond royal demesne and included various types of terrain, not exclusively woodland. Within the royal Forest, the king had exclusive hunting rights over the most desirable beasts, unless he granted specific permission. Likewise, the tenant of land within the Forest needed royal permission or supervision for the taking of wood or the grazing of beasts. Those who committed offences against the laws of the Forests were penalised severely, and the laws of the Forest were seen as having their own particular character.

Keywords: Anglo-Norman period; royal forest; hunting rights; tenant

Chapter.  16293 words. 

Subjects: History of Law

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