Chapter

Kings and Law

John Hudson

in The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780198260301
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191740640 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260301.003.0021

Series: The Oxford History of the Laws of England

Kings and Law

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The Angevin kings possessed much more extensive territories than had their Anglo-Norman predecessors. In particular, they ruled both Anjou and the duchy of Aquitaine in south-western France. Such extensive territories added to the pressure on kings to spend considerable time outside England, leaving others to administer the realm. The cost of defending their French lands, and of seeking to regain Normandy following its loss in 1204, put great pressure on royal finances, and exploitation of royal judicial and legal rights was one means of raising money. Such developments, together with increasing use of writing in government and developments in academic studies, including that of law, provide crucial background to legal change in the period 1154–1215. This chapter discusses law and kingship, royal officials, Angevin reform, and reforms and reformers.

Keywords: Angevin period; kings; kingship; royal officials; reforms

Chapter.  20235 words. 

Subjects: History of Law

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