Chapter

Michael Moore's Metaphysical Realism

Brian Bix

in Law, Language, and Legal Determinacy

Published in print November 1995 | ISBN: 9780198260509
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191682100 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260509.003.0006

Series: Clarendon Paperbacks

Michael Moore's Metaphysical Realism

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The metaphysical realism of Michael Moore reviewed language as a path to finding the correct result and held that temptation towards the wrong path must be overcome. Moore's challenge is aimed at legal thinking upon the premise that most of us are terribly misguided, fundamentally mistaken regarding the nature of law, nature of language, and even the nature of reality. The metaphysical realist theory of meaning is based on the idea that a word refers to a natural kind. Under this approach, the use of a word, and the definition we offer for it, will not necessarily be static, but will change our understanding of the object, event, or idea. The chapter discusses the remaining approach, with focus on realism about meaning and Wittgenstein's critique of that position.

Keywords: metaphysical realism; Michael Moore; realism; law; nature; reality

Chapter.  17567 words. 

Subjects: Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law

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