Chapter

The Minotaur: Disturbed Women and Monstrous Visions

Paul Rock

in Reconstructing a Women's Prison

Published in print May 1996 | ISBN: 9780198260950
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191682179 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260950.003.0053

Series: Clarendon Studies in Criminology

The Minotaur: Disturbed Women and Monstrous Visions

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The regimes of prisons are unstable. This book has already shown how Holloway prison itself had moved precariously and rapidly through a succession of political systems, the quest for authority sometimes veering more towards winning the acquiescence of the incarcerated, sometimes more towards the application of force. During the early part of the 1980s, authority was upheld less by compliance-based methods than by a show of power. The creation of legitimacy and consent was never wholly absent from the thinking of managers and officers, but there can be little doubt that Holloway was more transparently coercive in its methods at that time, and force and its consequences came to typify the social organisation of the prison. The Governor during a significant portion of that time, Joy Kinsley, also took it as her task to re-introduce order in what had quite evidently become a turbulent institution.

Keywords: authority; compliance-based methods; power; legitimacy; consent; Holloway prison; Joy Kinsley

Chapter.  16592 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Criminal Law

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