Chapter

Conclusion

Paul Rock

in Reconstructing a Women's Prison

Published in print May 1996 | ISBN: 9780198260950
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191682179 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260950.003.0058

Series: Clarendon Studies in Criminology

Conclusion

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The development of Holloway prison also conveys something of the organisation of knowledge about women criminals. Holloway looms large in the criminal justice system and it played an important part in shaping public experience. After all, it is the principal prison for women in England and Wales, being set in the capital, with the largest number of female inmates, near Whitehall, Parliament, and the national press and television. It is a remand prison and its testers have worked ceaselessly to manufacture data about its occupants. Its reconstruction was a conspicuous experiment in social change. It is hardly remarkable that the prison should have attracted much of the political, criminological and media gaze on criminal women in the 1960s and 1970s. The transformations of typifications of female delinquency had their greater and lesser histories.

Keywords: Holloway prison; women criminals; criminal justice system; female inmates; reconstruction; social change

Chapter.  2857 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Criminal Law

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