Chapter

The Pauline School: Three ‘Pastoral’ Epistles to Timothy and Titus, to Further Faith and Order in the Household of God

John Reumann

in Variety and Unity in New Testament Thought

Published in print July 1991 | ISBN: 9780198262015
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191682285 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198262015.003.0009

Series: Oxford Bible Series

The Pauline School: Three ‘Pastoral’ Epistles to Timothy and Titus, to Further Faith and Order in the Household of God

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This chapter discusses the first and second Timothy and Titus, which give a glimpse of what happened to Pauline Christianity about the end of the 1st century—or, others have maintained, late in Paul's career in the middle 60s, or, others claim, in the 2nd century. The three documents appear in the canon, after Paul's letters to congregations, in a sub-collection of four letters to individuals. They are arranged in order of decreasing length, with little Philemon coming after Titus. The three ‘pastoral letters’ so named by a Pietist, Paul Anton, even though the term ‘shepherd’ or pastor never appears in them—are ostensibly from Paul, ‘an apostle of Jesus Christ’, to assistants in the Pauline mission who are known from other New Testament books. The pastorals pose the question of variety and unity in two ways: first, with regard to the other letters of Paul, and second among themselves.

Keywords: Pauline Christianity; documents; shepherd; pastoral letters; apostle; New Testament

Chapter.  7512 words. 

Subjects: Biblical Studies

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