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Speech at the Lauterpacht Centre 25th Anniversary Celebrations also marking the 80th birthday of the Centre’s founder, Sir Elihu Lauterpacht

Rosalyn Higgins Dbe Qc

in Themes and Theories

Published in print August 2009 | ISBN: 9780198262350
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191682322 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198262350.003.0075
Speech at the Lauterpacht Centre 25th Anniversary Celebrations also marking the 80th birthday of the Centre’s founder, Sir Elihu Lauterpacht

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Professor Philip Allott has changed forever our perceptions of how a proper English international lawyer should behave. By writing, radically, on philosophy, he made merely the creation of theory a respectable pursuit for others. Not all legal theory can also claim then to be included in the category of philosophy. Of course, with Allott, philosophy comes first and legal theory is but a consequence of it. Allott believes that the state system itself is inherently inimical to the betterment of the human condition. His book, Eunomia, explores the achievement of an international humanity not through the victory of one type of state over another, but through a reordering of society in a way that represents humanity as a whole and denies the state system. Allott finds that international law is an essential vehicle in the passage from here to there, being the mechanism by which society consciously re-creates itself. He calls for ‘a revolution not in the streets but in the mind’. Eunomia is a work of political philosophy in which international law has an important role.

Keywords: Philip Allott; international law; Eunomia; legal theory; political philosophy

Chapter.  2231 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

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