Chapter

Conclusion

John D. Brewer, Bill Lockhart and Paula Rodgers

in Crime In Ireland 1945–95:

Published in print July 1997 | ISBN: 9780198265702
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191682940 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198265702.003.0004

Series: Clarendon Studies in Criminology

Conclusion

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Crime in Northern Ireland presents a paradox, both to lay people and criminologists, but this study has clarified some of the parameters of the puzzle. The traditional and sectarian form in which Northern Ireland's industrialization developed to the point where it came under threat with economic restructuring in the 1950s, leading to an increase in crime which was linked to the pervasive influences of social change from Britain's mass popular culture. Civil unrest intensified some types of ordinary crime, although not all. The survival of traditional social forms in some local contexts mediates the social deprivation that also characterizes these same areas. This study of crime in Ireland has mapped some of the broad environmental differences that exist in crime within the island, North and South, and at the city level for Belfast and Dublin. It has also highlighted other geographical variations within each jurisdiction.

Keywords: Northern Ireland; Irish Republic; civil unrest; crime trends; social deprivation; ordinary crime

Chapter.  6393 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law

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