Chapter

Lecture One—The Background

Tony Weir

in Economic Torts

Published in print October 1997 | ISBN: 9780198265931
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191683008 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198265931.003.0001

Series: Clarendon Law Lectures

Lecture One—The Background

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This book is concerned with economic harm which is not connected with and not consequent upon any harm to the claimant's body or property as actual physical things. This lecture argues first, contrary to the view of the House of Lords, that while it is certainly tortious to get a person deliberately to break his contract with a person one is aiming at — for example, by suborning his agents — there is no further tort of interference with people's contracts. Second, contrary to the views of most writers, the lecture argues that while it is certainly tortious to cause deliberate economic harm by wrongful means, the requirement that the means be wrongful is entirely correct, sensible, and practical. Third, it holds that inducing breach of contract is simply an instance of the tort just mentioned and has no significantly divergent features or rules.

Keywords: economic loss; contracts; English law; breach of contract

Chapter.  9210 words. 

Subjects: Civil Law

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