Chapter

Second Sojourn at Rome

George Lawless

in Augustine of Hippo and his Monastic Rule

Published in print August 1990 | ISBN: 9780198267416
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683244 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198267416.003.0004

Series: Clarendon Paperbacks

Second Sojourn at Rome

Show Summary Details

Preview

The failure of Roman students to pay their tuition-fees and the lure of a professorship occasioned the move of Augustine to Milan. While resting from their journey and waiting for a ship to sail, Augustine and Monica were graced with the famous so-called ‘vision of Ostia’ which has become ‘a battlefield for rival exegetes’. Unsettled political fortunes caused further delay of about one year before Augustine and his party could return to Africa. In Rome, Augustine began writing the first of many anti-Manichaean treatises, The Ways of the Catholic Church and the Manichaeans. Two other treatises, Magnitude of the Soul and Freedom of the Will, soon followed, both of which were dialogues with Evodius. Immortality of the Soul had been Augustine's last book before baptism, and it was unique for being the only one of his voluminous writings without a single citation from the Bible. To suggest that the author of the Confessions imposed a much later cast of mind upon the events which happened at least ten years previously is not, in this particular case, convincing.

Keywords: Rome; Augustine; Monica; Africa; baptism; Confessions; vision of Ostia; Milan

Chapter.  2960 words. 

Subjects: Early Christianity

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.