Chapter

Presenting Probabilities in Court

MIKE REDMAYNE

in Expert Evidence and Criminal Justice

Published in print March 2001 | ISBN: 9780198267805
Published online January 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191714856 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198267805.003.0004

Series: Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice

Presenting Probabilities in Court

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This chapter begins by discussing several problems in presenting the probabilities in court. It then makes an analysis of how probabilities are evaluated in court through empirical research. It also discusses the use of likelihood ratios in verbal conventions, frequencies, error rates, specifying alternative hypotheses, and precision and pragmatism. Moreover, it presents several database problems encountered and other evidence types used when presenting statistical evidence in courts.

Keywords: empirical research; verbal conventions; likelihood ratios; error rates; frequencies; precision; pragmatism; database; alternative hypotheses

Chapter.  20570 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law

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